New 3D Mammogram

The most exciting advancement to Mammography in over 30 years. -View Brochure

 

North Fork Radiology is recognized by the American College of Radiology as an Accredited Mammography Facility. All technologists are certified in Mammography and Board Certification is a requirement for all of our Radiologists. Our mammography program is geared to meet the needs of our patients. Screening and a diagnostic mammography services are provided. When scheduling your mammogram appointment you will be asked a series of questions to determine if your mammogram should be screening or diagnostic in nature. If possible, try to not schedule your mammogram while you have your period, during which time the breasts can be more sensitive and may result in unnecessary discomfort.

In addition, North Fork Radiology provides breat biopsy services out of our Southampton Hospital location.

 

HOW TO PREPARE FOR YOUR MAMMOGRAM

The day of your examination please refrain from wearing deodorant, lotion, powder, creams or perfume. If you did apply any such products, they must be completely removed before the examination. Wear a skirt or pants the day of the examination so that only your top has to be removed. Do not wear a dress. Please remember to bring a prescription for your mammogram, which can be obtained from your primary care or OBGYN physician.

WHAT IS

SCREENING MAMMOGRAPHY?

A screening mammography is a radiographic examination (x-ray) that is performed on an annual basis and is routine in nature for women who have no breast complaints. Screening mammography evaluates breast tissue for any potential abnormalities, with the goal to detect unsuspected breast cancer at an early stage, before tumors may actually be felt. Your examination is performed on state-of-the-art equipment accredited by both the ACR and FDA.

HOW IS A SCREENING MAMMOGRAM PREPARED?

A qualified Technologist who is ARRT certified in mammography will perform your examination by positioning each breast between two clear plates. The plates compress the breast tissue to allow the clearest image of your breast. The compression may be somewhat uncomfortable, but is necessary to achieve the proper images.

The technologist will ask you to wait while she checks the films to be sure the images are clear and complete. The technologist does not review your mammogram for abnormalities. If the technologist requires additional views it indicates only that they want to be certain all breast tissue is visible on the films.

SCREENING MAMMOGRAM RESULTS

All screening mammograms are read by Board Certified Radiologists. If there are no abnormal findings you and your referring physician will receive written notification within 7 business days and will most likely be instructed to return in a year for your next screening mammogram.

The interpreting Radiologist may require that you return for additional images or a breast ultrasound. If this is the case, our office will contact you within 72 hours. There is no reason to worry should additional images be required. Folds in breast tissue or superimposition of structures may require additional views or ultrasound to clearly evaluate the breast tissue.It is important to remember that for most women who are called back, the additional views or breast ultrasound show there is no problem. Often these additional images provide the radiologist with additional information needed for a more detailed assessment of one or more specific areas of your breast.

PATIENT FORMS >

 

WHAT IS

DIAGNOSTIC MAMMOGRAPHY?

Diagnostic mammography is an x-ray exam of the breasts that is performed to evaluate a breast complaint or abnormality detected by a physical examination or a screening mammogram. Diagnostic mammography services are different from screening mammography in that additional views of the breast are usually taken, as opposed to two views typically taken with screening mammography. Thus, diagnostic mammography is usually more time-consuming and costly than screening mammography.

A diagnostic mammogram can help detect calcifications, cysts and masses. Calcifications are tiny mineral deposits within the breast tissue that appear as small white regions on the mammogram films. A mass is a group of cells clustered together more densely than the surrounding tissue and a cyst is a non-cancerous collection of fluid in the breast.

In most cases, diagnostic mammography will help show that an abnormality is benign (non-cancerous). When this occurs, the radiologist will recommend follow-up diagnostic mammography in 6 or 12 months. If an abnormality is determined to be suspicious, however, additional breast imaging such as breast ultrasound or biopsy may be necessary for further evaluation.

HOW IS A DIAGNOSTIC MAMMOGRAM PERFORMED?

A qualified Technologist who is ARRT certified in mammography will perform your examination by positioning each breast between two clear plates and/or paddles. The plates compress the breast tissue to allow the clearest image of your breast. The compression may be somewhat uncomfortable, but is necessary to achieve the proper images. Typical views for diagnostic mammograms include the cranio-caudal view (CC), medio lateral oblique view (MLO), and supplemental views tailored to the specifications.

DIAGNOSTIC MAMMOGRAM RESULTS

The technologist will ask you to wait while she checks the images with a Radiologist to be sure there is sufficient clarity and completeness. The technologist does not review your mammogram for abnormalities. Subsequently, after you leave, the Radiologist will interpret your images and send the formal report to your referring physician. You can follow up and discuss the results with your referring physician.

PATIENT FORMS >

OUR MAMMOGRAPHY SPECIALISTS

BRAD S. GLUCK, MD

Dr. Brad S. Gluck is a Board Certified physician in radiology whose specialty is Body and Breast Imaging. He is a magna cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Columbia College. He received his Medical Degree from Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. Having served as Chief Resident, Dr. Gluck completed his residency at the Mount Sinai Medical Center, NY and fellowship at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center.

Dr. Gluck’s published writings, lectures, and TV appearances have focused on Breast and Body imaging and radiographic contrast agents. He is a Clinical Assistant Professor in Radiology at the School of Medicine, State University of New York at Stony Brook and Lecturer in Radiology at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine. He is currently on the medical staff of Southampton, Central Suffolk and Eastern Long Island Hospitals. Dr. Gluck is a member of The American College of Radiology, The Radiological Society of North America, and The Suffolk County Medical Society.