WHAT IS A MRI SCAN?

An MRI or magnetic resonance imaging is a medical diagnostic technique that creates images of the body using the principles of magnetic resonance. An MRI can generate thin-section images of any part of the body including the heart, arteries and veins—from any angle and direction. MRI scanning is preferred for diagnosing most diseases of the brain and central nervous system, as well as the musculoskeletal system, and some applications in the neck, abdomen, and pelvis. MRI scanning is possible in the body because the body contains protons, the nucleus of the hydrogen atom.

The principles of MRI takes advantage of the the magnetic properties of protons distributed in varying amounts in body tissues, allowing for the differentiation of these tissues in both healthy and diseased states. Since MRI scanning uses magnetic and radio waves there is no exposure to radiation.

 

HOW IS A MRI SCAN PERFORMED?

The patient lies inside a large cylinder-shaped magnet. The diagnostic process follows three steps. First, the MRI creates a steady state within the body placing the body in a steady magnetic field. Then the MRI stimulates the body with radio waves to change the steady-state orientation of the protons. It then stops the radio waves and "listens" to the body's electromagnetic transmissions at a selected frequency. The transmitted signal is used to construct internal images of the body.

Some examinations require the patient to receive an injection of "contrast material" to facilitate visualization of various structures.

During the examination you must remain completely still and closely follow the instructions of the MRI technologist. MRI scans take approximately 20-30 minutes, depending on the type of exam.

HOW DO I PREPARE FOR AN MRI Scan?

There are no preparation requirements for MRI, however, if other imaging modalities were performed at another facility relevant to your scheduled examination, it is necessary to bring copies (CD or film) of those studies with you.

WHO CAN'T HAVE AN MRI SCAN AND WHY?

It is important to note that patients with cardiac pacemakers, patients who might have iron filings next to their eyes (for example, sheet metal workers), patients with inner ear transplants and patients with aneurysm clips in their brains are not candidates for MRI scans, as such an examination can be hazardous and can result in harm or death.

PLEASE BRING ANY PRIOR CT or MRI (CD or Film) with you for comparison purposes, if they were not performed at North Fork Radiology, or one of our other sites listed in the locations page.

PATIENT FORMS >

OUR MRI SPECIALISTS

DANIEL RESNICK, MD

Dr. Daniel Resnick is a board certified diagnostic radiologist whose specialty is in Musculoskeletal and Body Imaging, and MRI. He obtained a Bachelor of Science from Cornell University (Ithaca, NY) and a Medical degree at New York University (New York, NY). During medical school at NYU, Dr. Resnick participated in the 5 years Honors Research Pathway, during which he was able to contribute in the publication of over 10 Body Imaging research papers in peer-reviewed journals or conferences, including some as primary author. During his year of research, Dr. Resnick was awarded the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) Medical Student Departmental Research grant (2001) which helped fund his year of research and the research of future students at NYU.

Dr. Resnick's clinical and residency training includes a 1 year Internal Medicine internship at New York University Medical Center (Bellevue and Tisch Hospital), a 4 year radiology residency at Long Island College Hospital (Brooklyn), as well as a Musculoskeletal Fellowship with Javier Beltran M.D. at Maimonides Hospital (Brooklyn). He is currently on the medical staff of Southampton and Eastern Long Island Hospital.

Dr. Resnick is a member of the Radiological Society of North America.